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Cover Story

Four months to delivery

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04 / WINTER 2012

Editorial

Ennio Cecchini, CEO

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A 2012 so exciting and successfull for us

I will steal you just a few moments from the interesting contents of this Buletin. I just want to thank personally all of you who have made this 2012 so exciting and succesful for our shipyard and in particular to the Clients who have trusted us and decided to build their next vessel at CdM. It is still incredible to me how much support, appreciation, interest and understanding we have received in this second year of life of Cantiere delle Marche.

Believe me, this makes my job so special and unique. The fact that all of our efforts in working at our best and in putting all of our energies into our projects is shared by so many of you: it is just fantastic and amazingly rewarding! It is with a big Thank You, Grazie, that I want to wish you the very best for this festivities, hoping to meet you again next year with the same enthusiasm and passion for Yachting. Because, at the end, this is all about: our love for Yachts and for the Sea!

Best Wishes
Ennio Cecchini, CEO

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Editorial

Vasco Buonpensiere, Sales and Marketing Director

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Results have overcome any expectations

In order to be consistent with the new format of this Buletin, where interviews have taken the place of most of the articles, I have been asked to answer to some questions by our great P.R. Manager Alessandra Suardi. How could I say no to this???

Vasco, it is that time of the year where we all make a balance of the past 12 months: what is your balance about CdM in 2012?
There is no doubt that results have overcome any expectations: in terms of sales, brand awareness and recognization, by the market of our efforts to build the best quality possible. Cannes and Fort Lauderdale Boat Shows have been incredible: I really want to take this occasion to express my gratitude to all the ones who have come to visit us onboard M/Y Percheron, who have appreciated what we do, and to the ones who decided to start going deeper into the purchase process immediately afterwards.

What would you reckon to be the best achievement of the last year?
I sincerely think that, beside the sales, the best achievement for all of us here at CdM is having seen M/Y Percheron arriving on the other side of the Atlantic on her maiden voyage with no one technical problem at all. They faced very high seas and strong wind (including the tail of Hurricane Raphael and the beginning of Hurrican Sandy) in complete comfort and safety. You can under stand better how seaworthy is a CdM vessel having a look at the video on our website where you can see how comfortable was the cruise with 57 knots of wind and 5 metres waves...! I have no words to describe the emotions we felt seeing the first CdM vessel arriving in the US only one year after having signed its purchase contract! I would like to thank the owner of Percheron publicly: without him, this dream would have never come true!

As usual, going towards the new year, it is also time of proposition and wishes...
My proposition – beside losing weight as every year... and every Monday – is quite simple: making sure that we will keep on designing and building our vessels at our best, not stopping to improve, trying to find always new solutions and technical challenges, keeping always our Clients as the real fulcre of our activity. Our mission is – in fact – very simple: to give to our Clients days and miles of happy cruising on all the Oceans. And this goes to my wish: I really wish to keep on working for the next decades with the most amazing team I have ever experienced in my career! Without them, nothing of what we are doing, and will do, would be possible.

Thank you guys, from the bottom of my heart.
Vasco Buonpensiere, Sales and Marketing Director

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Index

  • 01Four months to delivery
  • 02Talking with Wesley Kruger, Percheron's Captain
  • 03Luca Mastrogiovanni: Let’s talk about the first contact with CdM
  • 04There's a very real trend sweeping the yachting industry

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04 / WINTER 2012

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Published November 18, 2012

Four months to delivery

You wrote on a previous issue of this Buletin about your positive feelings related to the CdM approach and Customer Care immediately after having signed a contract on a new Darwin Class 96: you are now about four months to the delivery of it, can you tell us now about your CdM experience during the construction of it?
I cannot help but confirming the impression I had when I first approached CdM and which continued during the negotiation of the specifications and the contract. What really impresses of this shipyard is the level of commitment towards the clients and their yachts, of each and every person involved. The way we have dealt with customizations, how we have been adviced and guided throughout our decision process when it came to even the craziest requests, the experience that everybody transfers to you day by day is really exceptional. Every visit at the yard (now every month) is a pleasant and anjoyable experience, indeed. What I can really say is that you never feel like a customer waiting for a product, but always as a partner living the birth and the growth of the Creature together with the ones who are building it.

A Darwin Class vessel is definitely a Yacht built to explore and travel: are you planning to cruise also out of the Meditteranean? What is your cruising plan for the years to come? What is or will be your dream cruise?
For the first season we will cruise the Med extensively, starting from an Easter navigation in Croatia up to Venice, where we will prepare the boat for the summer season (provisioning, completing the boat with all our personal belongings etc). From Venice we will then start the real cruise southbound, touching Croatia, Montenegro, Greece, Turkey and then Sicily and the surrounding Islands (Egadi and Eolie), Sardinia and Corsica. We will attend Cannes Boat Show in Semptember and – depending on the season – we will then move to the Balearics. We are now deciding if we will stay in the Med for another season, finding the most secluded and ‘off the beaten path’ locations (there are many out there), or if we will leave the Med towards Fort Lauderdale Show and the Caribbeans where to spend the 2013 Christmas Holidays. That’s just the beginning... The great thing of a Darwin Class is that the limits to your cruising plans are only dictated by your time and interests!!!!!

We understand that Stella di Mare will be mainly a family boat: can you tell us about the main features of this Yacht which made you think it would have been appropriate for you and your family?
First of all, as a family boat which will cruise with all of us including children, the main feature which appealed us has been the reliability, the safety and seaworthiness of the project, of course. Secondarly, the incredible volume for a boat of this length will allow us to have a huge amount of space where to store supplies: we will have a deep freezer dedicated to meat, another one for vegetables, another one to ‘pasticci’, lasagne and fresh pasta. For us - probably as many other italians – food and good company is of paramount importance! Last but not least, we will have a huge walk-in cofferdam underneath the Vip cabin which is climatized and dedicated to about 1000 bottles of wine: a real cellar where good wines: the majority of them will obviously be the ones produced by our vineyard in the Collio region of Italy ‘Cantina Stella’!!! In order to be able to stay onboard extensively, we also have created a workstation in the wheelhouse with the proper communication and videoconference systems, which will allow us to be in constant contact with our companies.
What kind of toys or personal watercraft are you going to carry onboard?
We will have two tenders, one for the owners of 5.70 mt and one for the crew of 2.60 mt. On top of that we will also have two electric bycicles, two push bikes and one Hobie Cat Catamaran transformable in kayak and pedal boat, great for visiting small coves, having fun sailing, fishing and to let the kids enjoy the days we will spend at anchor in the most beautiful and secluded bays. We have also a diving station with tanks, wetsuits, a dedicated compressor. Everything we need to enjoy our time at sea and on land.

Now it is time to answer to the same question we ask to all CdM clients who kindly accept to write on this Buletin: could you please summarize your CdM experience in three adjectives?
Three are too few to really let people understand what CdM is all about, but let me try: professional (everything is dealt with at very high standards indeed, also if compared to other industries), different (they really think out of the box and you never have answers like: ‘this is the way we have always done’ or ‘this is the way it has been always done in the industry’), flexibility (I do not think that there is nother shipyard building boats of this size which really push customization of every single detail so far). Please let me add one: friends. The exact words to describe the CdM expierence, and what my family and I feel every time we are with CdM, are actually: friendship and partnership. I want to take this opportunity and wish to all of the CdM team a great Christmas and a Happy New Year, thanking them for what they are doing for us.

S.S., Owner of Darwin Class 96 M/Y Stella di Mare

Photo by: Maurizio Paradisi

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Published November 29, 2012

Talking with Wesley Kruger, Percheron's Captain

Hello, I am Wesley Kruger from Durban, South Africa. I have been yachting in the Caribbean and Mediterranean for most of my career. I received my Captains license in 2008 and Oceans’s Navigation in 2009. I have been cruising Caribbean waters for the past 3years and look forward to world cruising on the beautiful and impeccably constructed Darwin 86. A surfer, free diver and scuba diver at heart, my love of the Ocean and commitment to service and safety allows me to continue pursue my goals, happily, as a world cruising captain.

You are a very young captain of an over engineered and very special Explorer Vessel Darwin Class 86, which you have followed all along its construction: can you tell us about your experience at Cantiere Delle Marche?
I am a very young Captain and admit that one year ago I was very nervous for the challenge that lay ahead of me. I knew there was a lot to learn and I would need to put a large effort in following the construction of the vessel. I had to get very involved in every small detail of the construction, learning as much as possible from the experienced engineers and technical staff of Cantiere Delle Marche. This was large task that lay ahead of me and if not for the family at Cantiere Delle Marche and their constant assistance and guidance, I would have definitely had a more difficult time. Everyday from seven in the morning to seven at night my mind was like a sponge, listening and learning as much as possible. Cantiere Delle Marche gave me my own private office in the yard, where I could study manuals and schematics. Above my office was the technical department where I visited frequently asking questions and seeking guidance. I was always welcome and no matter how busy Massimo, Domenico, Danielle, Michele or Vasco were, they would always take the time to answer my questions or go on board with me and discuss the current technical issue. I had a fantastic time at CDM and I am forever grateful for the experience. I learnt more than I could have ever learnt at any marine school. I miss the CDM family and truly hope I will be back one day to follow another of their constructions.

Taking command of a brand new Yacht of 86 feet is always an exciting experience indeed, but taking delivery of her and immediately after crossing the Atlantic Ocean on her bottom makes it even more special: can you please summarize for us your translatlantic crossing focusing on the technical side of it?
Yes, it was a very exciting experience and due to the tight schedule we had after delivery, there was serious planning and time management to carry out. By the time we had reached Gibraltar we had 250hrs on the main engines and reached the 300hr service on the generators. This was nice timing as we could perform the necessary services on the engines to make sure they were in prime condition right before the Atlantic crossing. During our week in Gibraltar I had to make sure all spare parts, oils and equipment was on board. I received great assistance from Captain Marco Covre during this time. As Marco had crossed the Atlantic twenty two times before and this was my first, who better to have on board to assist myself and my crew. I had Marco go over all my passage planning, spares purchasing lists and provisioning lists. After Marco’s input and the final purchasing of supplies, we were ready to for the cruise to the Canary Islands. We had a few days in the Canaries after arrival to refuel and inspect all the engineering equipment. Marco and I went through our planning and discussed how we would handle the engineering inspections while under way. Then, there we went: the water maker, air conditioning, steering and stabilizers did a fantastic job. We experienced no problems with this machinery. However the steering oil temperatures seemed slightly high for our comfort at times. Due to the constant following seas along the entire crossing, the rudders were working overtime to keep us on course. Therefore each day for thirty minutes or so, we would steer by hand, only to give the automatic pilot a rest. Towards the end of the passage we experienced a low flow while using the fuel polisher. We first noticed this as we were burning the same amount of fuel as the fuel polisher was producing. Therefore as to not damage any equipment we decided not to use the fuel polisher, but instead use the fuel transfer pump to supply the daily tanks with fuel. Thanks to the CDM’s detailed user manual, it was a only a matter of turning three valves into the right position to redirect the fuel past the polisher and into the daily tanks. After the crossing all the fuel polisher needed was a cleaning and after we had good flow again. We had a few glitches in the navigational equipment. A rare loss in heading which meant we had to restart the system and a few incorrect parameters all of which Arimar is ready to fix and adjust for us. Seeing as this was my first crossing, at the end I asked Marco the obvious question on how he felt the yacht and its machinery handled it. He was very impressed and said it could have not been an easier time more successful crossing, seeing as the only “serious” problem was the low flow rate through the fuel polisher. Overall, this means I am very happy with the yacht and it’s equipments performance.

Now that we have heard about the ‘cold facts’: how was this experience overall? Is there a special anecdote/event which you would like to remember with us?
To be honest it was such an overwhelming experience that I don’t know how to pick one special event to note. The entire experience was one I and I’m sure the crew too, will never forget. It was a challenge and one I can not take credit for. It was a team effort which involved the entire crew, Captain Marco and the team at CDM. Every individual involved contributed to the successful crossing and the arrival in Fort Lauderdale, in time for the boat show. We did it and that’s all I have to say really. I think if you had to follow our blog, you would get a good understanding of the daily experiences and emotions we encountered. I think for me the major events were the existence of Hurricane Rafael and after Hurricane Sandy. Thanks to Maxsea and the program it offers to download up to date weather conditions constantly, we were able to accurately track these systems and navigate safely pass them. We are sure that the crew dynamics during such a long non-stop cruise are delicate to manage for a captain on a Yacht of this size: how did you organize the daily routine and how did you plan the shifts?
This is absolutely correct and I feel is just as important as managing the passage plans and inspections of your equipment and machinery. Firstly we tried to create a normal as possible life on board, by attempting to eat every meal together. We decided to have Alex cook every meal, while not having to sit on navigational watch. This allowed us to have normal meals on board and not skip a meal or have quick snacks instead. Therefore all the crew felt healthily and well fed for every meal. Secondly with the four remaining crew, besides Alex, we decided to rotate the watch schedules. We felt if one person would constantly do the early morning watch, 1am-4am for example, it would have been more demanding on that individual. So by rotating the schedule everyone had the same amount of rest and experienced the less or more tiring watches equally. During the light hours, every one would usually be awake. We would have duties of cleaning the interior and rinsing the exterior and well not on watch and after duties were finished we would either listen to music on the flybridge, sunbath, man the fishing lines, etc. Lastly seeing as we had fantastic weather conditions, we had a very easy and enjoyable crossing. I can only imagine having bad conditions for 14days and how uncomfortable the experience could have been, but thanks to weather monitoring and good planning we avoided those bad conditions.

Please describe the Darwin Class 86 M/Y Percheron with five adjectives after such an experience.
Powerful, Tough, Reliable, Stable and Majestic.

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Published December 3, 2012

Luca Mastrogiovanni: Let’s talk about the first contact with CdM

Let’s talk about the first contact with Cantiere delle Marche: who has decided to investigate this new shipyard, you or your Principal?
At the end of 2011 I was collecting preliminary informations about few shipyards on behalf of my Owner. When I got in touch with CdM I was already at a further step in our choosing process: CdM and other two shipyards in Europe met the criterias of design, type of construction, layout desired from my German Owner. Time to see and touch!

Can you tell us about yout first visit at the Shipyard? What were your first feelings and how did you find the CdM approach to you as a client’s representative?
I have been in Ancona early February 2012. Beutiful and new facility, generous technical spaces, everything clean and tyde. But there was more behind the first sight. Something that fused these elements together and added an extra value. I realized it as soon as we left the conference room to go in the working area among the workers, the hulls, the steel and the tools: the general atmosphere created by men not only knowing what they are doing, but doing it with passion. Everybody at CdM is involved and committed, from workers to managers, for the same result: a great product.

How would you summarize, instead, the first visit with your principal in Ancona?
It was just a confirmation of what I personally witnessed a couple of months before. Their capacity to listen, understand and elaborate a solution, meeting the Owner’s and Captain’ needs was clear to us since the beginning, and for sure has been the crucial point that made my Owner choose to build its next Yacht at CdM.

Seen the positive experience during the first steps into the decision process for both you and the client, how did CdM cope with the specification discussion, and how did you find the technical team approach to it?
If I had to summarize in one word the feeling about this project, I would say partnership. In order to better explain this concept, let me just stress the fact that we worked both on specs and design like we have never seen before in shipyards building boats of this size. The technical team has listened to us attentively, trying to satisfy all of our needs, with only one fixed parameter: they would have never accepted choices which would jeopardize the overall quality of the project and the build. As far as the design is concerned, we appreciated the same approach from Mario and Massimo at nauta: it is enough to say that both internally that externally the Nauta Air 80 has been radically changed: the Yacht my principal bought is in fact a… Nauta Air 88!

Which are the main features which appealed both of you (on different aspects obviously) about the Nauta Air 88?
On the technical aspect, I have ben immediately caught by the comprehensive standard specs proposed by the yard: no hidden extras, a lot of redundancy and overengineering. The changes I asked - and have been accepted - are mainly related to personal likings due to my former experiences. For the owner, the main features which brought to the final decision are defintely the dimension of the fly bridge (more than 65 square metres), the volumes, the in-and-out feeling thank to the huge windows and the contemporary exterior lines which are so elegant that, in ten years time, will still look beautiful.

Now that CdM is starting to assembling the Hull of the vessel which you will captain in 18 motnhs time, which are your feelings and your expectations?
We will see the hull completed in a few months. It’s just exciting to know that all aspects of this new build will be characterized by a real personal touch, and to start working with such a unique team. I have already started talking with all the relevant people involved, from Giorgione who will take care of the engine room, to Turi, Luca, Domenico, Massimo (such an experienced chief of the technical department!) and I know that we will definitely have a good and profitable time together. I expect from them what I actually already know they will do: building the highest quality in an enjoyable working atmosphere, as it has been already confirmed to me by the captains and surveyors who have already taken delivery of their Yachts at CdM.
Dear Luca, it is almost Christmas time: what would you ask to CdM as a wish to become true from here to the Delivery of the Nauta Air 88?
That’s easy: I wish that the team at CdM will keep on doing their job the way they have done on the former vessels. In a few words: the best quality I have had the possibility to witness in the last years of my professional experience!

Luca Mastrogioanni, Nauta Air 88 Captain

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Published December 20, 2012

There's a very real trend sweeping the yachting industry

In a similar way to the popularity of 4x4’s and off-road vehicles superseding the saloon car, mountain bikes the standard bicycle and snowboarding overtook skiing, there’s a very real trend sweeping the yachting industry today; that of the explorer yacht. The burgeoning number of builds, projects and designs in this category is being driven by a new breed of owner: one who values spending time with their family discovering ‘off piste’ destinations, is mindful of fuel consumption, appreciates security and desires plenty of space onboard for toys.

Craig Barnett - Editor Yachts Emirates & Invictus

Before the fashion takes a real hold however, maybe now is the time to draw a distinction between true blue-blooded explorer yachts – hardy ‘go anywhere’ steel vessels, with robust seakeeping hulls and commercial strength engineering and systems – and the new breed of ‘explorer inspired’ or ‘expedition styled’ yachts. While the latter may share many attributes and boast an extended range, one suspects they are suited to little more than the perennial migration between the Med and Caribbean. On some of the designs we’ve witnessed of late I certainly wouldn’t like to brave a blow at the Horn, or trust in the teeth of a Southern Ocean gale.

Given the current popularity of this genre, most self-respecting yards and designers will currently have an explorer-style yacht in their portfolio. But when comparing a true explorer yacht with a leisure yacht, the owner should be made aware of its true capabilities. If it’s a Porsche Cayenne luxury ‘off roader’ style yacht they want, that’s all very well, but don’t pass it off as a Land Rover. There’s a very real danger of the uninitiated being introduced to sheep in wolf’s clothing. In order to delineate the separate genres, maybe a new sub-class can be formed… following the lead of the automotive sector I believe SUV or ‘sports utility vehicle’ would be an accurate description.

Having said all the above, I must however now eat my words to a certain extent. Building an enviable international reputation with their true explorer yachts delivered to date, Cantiere delle Marche now confound my theory by launching the Nauta series. Never a yard to follow the herd, they’ve swum diametrically against the tide and have developed the Nauta range of yachts based on the solid engineering principles of their Darwin series. While many yards are dressing luxury yachts in explorer designs, CDM are dressing explorer quality builds in luxury yacht styling. If it always takes an exception to prove a rule, I must thank CDM for being exceptional.

Having spent considerable time at the CDM factory, witnessed their latest launch MY Percheron in her various stages of build and enjoyed a cruise aboard her in the gentle Mediterranean, it was perhaps most fitting that we last saw each other as Hurricane Sandy raged around us at the Fort Lauderdale Boat Show. In the howling gale and lashing rain MY Percheron appeared not just resolute against the elements, but positively cheerful as all around her wilted. Just like their yacht, the CDM team also took the inclement conditions gleefully in their stride and offering merry safe haven from the tempest. Their only condition of shelter... you’ve just finished reading it.

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